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Using Seashells to display terminal output to a web browser

Introduction Having the ability to display your terminal output to a web browser would be a neat feature to have. In this article, we will be discussing a tool named Seashells that does exactly that. Seashells lets you pipe output from command-line programs to the web in real-time, even without installing any new software on […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

Netstat : Master it with these 6 steps

Netstat is a command line utility that can be used to list out all the network connections on a system. It lists out all the tcp, udp socket connections and the unix socket connections. Netstat also displays various network related information such as network connections, routing tables, interface statistics, masquerade connections, multicast memberships etc. In this […]

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| by Arround The Web

npm package manager – install and use on Centos 7

Introduction Node.js is a Javascript platform for server-side programming that allows users to build network applications quickly. JavaScript is a client-side programming language, which means it’s processed within the user’s browser. With the advent of Node.js, JavaScript can also be used as a server-side language. By leveraging Javascript on both the front-end and the back-end, […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

Mtr : Stop using ping and traceroute anymore

In today’s guide, we are going to look at the mtr command and see what it can tells us about network connections.  Mtr is a simple linux command line tool that you can use for network diagnostic and troubleshooting in linux. It comes with the options of both ping and traceroute commands. Just like a […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

Learn how to send emails using Linux in 5 minutes

If I ask you how to send an email, what would you say? You will say go to gmail or yahoo mail and send the email. But, do you know that you can send emails using your Linux command line? Yes! you heard me right. We can do this by using the mail command. In […]

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| by Arround The Web

28 yum command examples for package management in Linux part 1

Introduction For managing software via the command line on our Redhat and Centos systems, we could use rpm directly or use yum which is somewhat of a feature rich front end for rpm. We covered the Linux rpm command and it’s features extensively in an earlier article. Yum is an acronym for yollowdog updater modified. […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

10 Examples of using nslookup in linux

The main use of nslookup is to help with any DNS issues you may have. You can use it to find the IP address of a host, find the domain name of an IP address, or find mail servers on a domain. This tool can be used in an interactive and a noninteractive mode. The Interactive mode […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

10 Examples of using Iptraf to monitor network traffic in linux

IPTraf is a network monitoring utility in linux that we can use to monitor IP traffic passing over the network. By using this tool, we can we can monitor various connections like TCP, UDP, ICMP, non-IP counts and also Ethernet load information etc. you can install IPtraf using the following command: #apt install iptraf Once it is installed, you can run the […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

What is ip command in linux

The ip command is a useful tool for assigning an address to a network interface and/or configure network interface parameters on Linux operating systems.  It is used to bring interfaces up or down, assign and remove addresses and routes, manage ARP cache, and much more. This command replaces old good and now deprecated ifconfig command on modern […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

8 examples of using ifconfig command

ifconfig is a network management tool in Linux that we can use to check the IP addresses of Linux systems as well as configure network interfaces. It allows users to to configure, manage and query network interface parameters via command line interface or in a system configuration scripts. In this guide, we will see how […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

How to use Ethtool in linux

Ethtool is a useful linux utility that we can use to view and modify the ethernet device settings. By following this article, you will learn how to change the speed in your network card, modify auto-negotiation settings and changing duplex modes in your network card. Installing ethtool #apt install ethtool Once it is installed, use […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

Echoping in linux Explained

Echoping is a simple linux tool that we can use to test the performance of a remote host (approximatively) by sending “echo” packets with TCP or UDP. After sending the “echo” packet, It will show the time taken to set up the TCP connection and to transfer the data. Execute the following command to install […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

What is arping in linux?

As we have already discussed in one of our previous articles, ARP protocol  is commonly used by layer two devices to communicate and discover each other easily. The arping utility performs an action similar to ping, but at the Ethernet layer. Where we can use ping to tests the reachability of an IP address, arping can be used to report the […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

How to take backups in linux using TAR command

The tape archive (tar) command was originally designed to back up filesystems to tape devices. Although many people now use the tar command to back up to non-tape devices, you should be aware of how to use tape devices as well. For the following examples, we assume that you do not have a tape drive […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

How to take Backups in linux using dd command

In one of our previous article, we have discussed how to take snapshot backups in a linux system. In this article we will see how to take backups in our linux file system using the dd command. The dd command is useful to back up entire devices, whether entire hard disks, individual partitions, or logical […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

4 commands you should know to compress files in linux

A common task on most modern operating systems is to combine and compress multiple files into a single file. This could be in order to store files on a smaller device, to make it easy to download files from a website, or to merge and compress files for email transport. This guide focuses on some […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

A beginner’s guide to using hard links in linux

Every file on the Linux filesystem starts with a single hard link. The link is between the filename and the actual data stored on the filesystem. Even if you delete the original file, the hard link will still has the data of the original file because the hard link acts as a mirror copy of the original file. […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

What are inodes in linux?

An inode is a data structure that contains metadata about a file. When the file system stores a new file on the hard disk, it stores not only the contents (data) of the file, but also extra properties like the name of the file, the creation date, its permissions, the owner of the file, and […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

A hands-on guide to using groups in Linux

In Linux, Users can be listed in groups. Groups allow you to set permissions on the group level instead of having to set permissions for every individual user. In this guide, we will see how to get the advantage of using groups in our Linux system. Groupadd Groups can be created with the groupadd command. […]

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| by Scott Kilroy

How to manage passwords in Linux

In our previous guide, we have discussed on how to secure our passwords in Linux. In this tutorial, we will see how to manage passwords in our Linux system. /etc/login.defs The /etc/login.defs file contains some default settings for user passwords like password aging and length settings. (You will also find the numerical limits of user […]

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